Book Review Saturday: Sarah’s Key

“Because they think we are different. So they are frightened of us.”

This book was hard to read. It’s so easy to put the Holocaust and its atrocities behind you and go about your day. Isn’t that what we are supposed to do? Not dwell on the past or give it another thought? This book slaps you in the face with it and then kicks you while you are down. Honestly, I knew very little about the French involvement in the deportation of Jews and that saddens me. We know what happened, we see the memorials and hear the sad tales but the digging stops there. We don’t want to face those kinds of truths. At one point, my boyfriend asked me why I was still reading if it makes me so upset? My answer was how can I not? The author does not spare you on details, and the pain is brought to life through her intertwining tale of Sarah, a Jewish child who was picked up by the French police, and Julia, a journalist investigating the round up.

Sarah is awoken by the French police banging on the apartment door. They ask for her father but he is already in hiding. The police are not aware of her little brother in the next room so she hides him away in the secret cupboard and locks the door. She knows he will be safe because she believes they will be coming right back. As they walk out onto the street her mother calls her father’s name and he appears. They board a train and are escorted to an arena where they are grouped with the other Jews. They remain there for days. Her brother has no one to save him. The children are eventually left alone and sent to Auschwitz. I waited for any sign of good news in Sarah’s story but little comes.

Julia is an American journalist married to a “typical” French man. She is asked to cover the anniversary of the roundup and becomes completely immersed in the story. Her research unfolds hidden secrets that her husband’s family wishes to stay buried. I don’t know if it’s the fact that she is a journalist or that the story so completely changes her but I just felt drawn to her character. I have buried myself into research and felt the changes in my own life. She wants to make a difference, she wants people to feel something. It’s a quality that appeals to me in a main character. I wasn’t a huge fan of her relationship with her husband that parallels her work, but overall this story will stay with me for a long time.

I highly recommend this book even if you normally shy away from historical fiction. It’s important to remember and study the past, and those emotions and feelings it sparks are what makes us human. It’s easy to leave things in the past, it takes courage to face it head on and learn from it. It only takes one person to change a life, one person to stand up for something, one person to help us remember.

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