Write About it Wednesday: Serial Killers, Henry Lee Lucas

“I was bitter at the world. I hated everything. There wasn’t nothin’ I liked. I was bitter as bitter could be.”

Disclaimer: Violent crime content.

It is no secret that I love crime. Crime novels, crime podcasts, past crimes and all the in between. I found a copy of Serial Killers by Joel Norris at my local book sale. One dollar to read about the nature, personal statements and unifying patters of a serial killer? Sold! I’m covering this book in small increments because it is loaded with information. Although some of it is outdated, it allows me the foundation for branching out on my own for further research. I had not heard of Henry Lee Lucas before this book. One completely creepy fact before I dive in: We share the same birthday. I didn’t even realize until I was reviewing the text again to write this review…but whoa. Isn’t it weird when you share the same birthday with someone or is it just me? It peaked my interest in his case even more.

Henry Lee Lucas was starved, beaten, forced to watch his mother have sex, even forced to wear girls’ clothing for his mother’s amusement. He watched his mother shoot one of her clients with a shotgun while blood splattered on him. His mother would kill or break anything he liked, just for the sake of taking his happiness away. Her abuse went so far as beating him over the head with a 2 x 4 piece of wood so hard that he laid in a semi-conscious state for over 3 days. The brain damage would later be linked to his lack of control over his violent behavior and ability to manage emotions. He finally killed her. He was sentenced to prison for the murder but was later released.

Lucas claims he committed his first murder, a 17-year-old female, when he was just 15 years old. He had sex with animals, sex with his half-brother and later married his 12-year-old cousin. Beth was originally raised as his “daughter” but the two claimed to be common law married up until her death by Lucas. In a heated argument about her desire to return home, he stabbed her in the chest and then cut her into pieces in Montague County, TX. Although he ended up confessing to 100s of murders along Interstate 35, his only other known kill was Granny Rich who was the only person close to him remaining. Many of his claims turned out to be false, but investigators had to rely on the information they had.

This book does an excellent job of listing out the many reasons behind his behavior. He was unable to cope with negative stimulus and was prone to blackouts. The propensity for violence was there at an early age, and given the constant abuse from his mother, only intensified. He noted that he only committed murder after drinking large amounts of alcohol. That mixed with his brain injuries led to little to no control over his emotions. He did not feel any remorse until he was acclimated to the prison system where his diet, routine and personality development could be nurtured.

How does this type of abuse go unnoticed? How do brain injuries go untreated or acknowledged? I found this case to be interesting for two reasons, a) the amount of research performed on his body, diet, etc. and how it related to his crimes and b) his outright confession to so many murders. We may never know how many he truly committed but that is only half of the story. 

What is everyone reading this month? Any spooky Halloween recommendations? I’d love to hear from you!

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Book Review Saturday: Love & Gelato

“Once I read that last entry, it was over. I’d never hear anything new from her again.”

Often, I forget how nice it is to step away from all my heavy reading and just enjoy a young adult novel. I can wrap up in a blanket, brew a cup of coffee and become completely lost in a story for hours. I was hoping to make a trip to meet with Jenna Evans Welch but due to a flat tire (why must I be an adult?), that trip was postponed. As fate would have it, I already finished the book and was packed and ready to go. Luckily, this book was just what I needed to kickstart my month of long October reads and I am planning new book trips for the upcoming year.

Love & Gelato starts off with Lina finding out about her mother’s illness. When she passes away, she requests that Lina travel to Italy to stay with an old friend, Howard. Her mother has sent a journal from her time spent in Italy to the cemetery where Howard lives. Lina becomes immersed in her journey and wishes to experience Italy in the same way as her mother once did. She quickly makes friends and even finds herself falling in love. The story bounces back and forth between Lina and her mother, but in an almost flawless way. The dual experience allows Lina to understand her mother and why she made certain life choices. I think this is a topic that is missed in most literature. The element of generations perception of one another. Most of us believe we “know” our parents, but do we really? Do we take the time to ask them questions and understand who they are? I long for my own journal from my mother so that I could share her experiences. It’s a missed opportunity for so many of us.

After reading this I need to a) try gelato and b) visit Italy…the author managed to describe both in wonderful detail and now it’s a must. The story has some secrets that come to light that will hold your attention, and who doesn’t love a good teen romance unfolding? Any of my fellow book lovers that have traveled to Italy, what is your favorite part? Are there secret bakeries scattered around cities with the good desserts? If so, I need to visit ALL of them. Happy Reading!

Write About it Wednesday: Carry A. Nation

“You put me in here a cub, but I will go out a roaring lion, and I will make all hell howl.”

I love podcasts. I subscribe to anything from history to crime and books in between. Two different podcasts covered Carry Nation and peaked my interest. Most would say that listening to two episodes about a woman would be thorough enough, but leave it to me to have more questions. I had never heard of Nation before listening: first to Stuff You Missed in History Class, and second Criminal with Phoebe Judge and I wanted to know more. I’m a sucker for strong female leaders.

Carry was a trouble maker in her youth until she fell ill and found God. She devoted her life to religion and saw fit to improve the lives of others with HER opinions. She was very reserved until a doctor who was boarding at her home stole a kiss in the dark. She soon found herself in love. Carry married Dr. Charles Gloyd, a well-known to everyone (except Carry) alcoholic, in her early 20’s that set her path in life. He was drunk at the ceremony and she never saw him sober again. Her father came to check on her a few months into the marriage and decided she had to return home immediately and leave her husband. Dr. Gloyd died 6 months after she left from complications due to alcohol abuse. No shock there. Carry was now responsible for her daughter and mother-in-law and needed a career. She became a teacher until she was fired for refusing to change the pronunciation of the short and long a. As a teacher myself, this excuse is so ridiculous that it’s comical. They just wanted her gone.

Her only plan was to marry. When she ran into David Nation she believed it was divine intervention. They were married a few weeks later and moved to Texas. This would be one of many moves as Nation faced disaster everywhere they attempted to settle. Their eventual move to Kansas started the famous saloon smashing and prohibition speeches. Carry noticed that several saloons were still fully operating under laws that forbade the sale of alcohol. She started with warnings but then began to throw bricks into saloons, carry a hatchet which she is well known for, and call out bar owners to close shop. It was her divine calling. She had visions that directed her behavior and many saloons were forced to close after Nation swept into town. Not everyone agreed with her behavior. In 1901, she was beaten by a group of women. She was jailed numerous times and during one of the stays, she began publishing a newsletter that eventually turned into a newspaper called “The Hatchet,” which supported prohibition and women’s rights.

I could talk about Carry Nation all night, but I’m going to save you time. Why in the world is this woman famous? If I decided to walk into a bar, tear it apart and break everything in sight and then tell everyone how they should be living…I’d be in jail for a very long time. Should you be honored for breaking the law because it doesn’t hold true to your own way of thinking? Her visions from God sound almost like Andrea Yates, the woman who drowned her children in the bathtub because she had a vision. Believer or non-believer, do we get to use a vision as an out for committing crimes? My research left me with only one thought: Carry Nation was a stubborn, semi-crazy woman in a network of prohibitionists who blamed alcohol for all the problems in the world. I don’t see her as a leader, but as a woman who is just as bad as the people she is trying to stop.

Book Review Saturday: Sarah’s Key

“Because they think we are different. So they are frightened of us.”

This book was hard to read. It’s so easy to put the Holocaust and its atrocities behind you and go about your day. Isn’t that what we are supposed to do? Not dwell on the past or give it another thought? This book slaps you in the face with it and then kicks you while you are down. Honestly, I knew very little about the French involvement in the deportation of Jews and that saddens me. We know what happened, we see the memorials and hear the sad tales but the digging stops there. We don’t want to face those kinds of truths. At one point, my boyfriend asked me why I was still reading if it makes me so upset? My answer was how can I not? The author does not spare you on details, and the pain is brought to life through her intertwining tale of Sarah, a Jewish child who was picked up by the French police, and Julia, a journalist investigating the round up.

Sarah is awoken by the French police banging on the apartment door. They ask for her father but he is already in hiding. The police are not aware of her little brother in the next room so she hides him away in the secret cupboard and locks the door. She knows he will be safe because she believes they will be coming right back. As they walk out onto the street her mother calls her father’s name and he appears. They board a train and are escorted to an arena where they are grouped with the other Jews. They remain there for days. Her brother has no one to save him. The children are eventually left alone and sent to Auschwitz. I waited for any sign of good news in Sarah’s story but little comes.

Julia is an American journalist married to a “typical” French man. She is asked to cover the anniversary of the roundup and becomes completely immersed in the story. Her research unfolds hidden secrets that her husband’s family wishes to stay buried. I don’t know if it’s the fact that she is a journalist or that the story so completely changes her but I just felt drawn to her character. I have buried myself into research and felt the changes in my own life. She wants to make a difference, she wants people to feel something. It’s a quality that appeals to me in a main character. I wasn’t a huge fan of her relationship with her husband that parallels her work, but overall this story will stay with me for a long time.

I highly recommend this book even if you normally shy away from historical fiction. It’s important to remember and study the past, and those emotions and feelings it sparks are what makes us human. It’s easy to leave things in the past, it takes courage to face it head on and learn from it. It only takes one person to change a life, one person to stand up for something, one person to help us remember.

Write About it Wednesday: Reading Goals


I celebrated an important milestone today: meeting my Goodreads reading challenge. I have read 65 books this year and its only September! I know it may sound like a low number to most fellow book lovers but this is a huge accomplishment for me. Taking time for myself has been a priority this year and reading time is at the forefront. I no longer feel that I’m letting anyone down by taking this time for me. Books are not only entertainment, but they allow me to learn and grow as a person. I have tackled many subjects that I had been longing to research and I’ve grown as a writer. I have been working my way through the Scarpetta series by Patricia Cornwell, tackling a few classics including War and Peace, finding new historical fiction authors and even read my first James Patterson. I spent a whole month researching the Underground Railroad, reading several books on the subject: fiction and nonfiction. I read new young adult authors at the suggestions of my students and ventured back into the world of Twilight. It has been a wonderful year already and I’m excited to see how many more I can manage to read before January.

What are your reading goals this year? Are you on track to meet them?

Write About it Wednesday: The Mystery Queen

“Grant a great age to Queen Nefertiti, long years may she keep the hand of the King.”

Have you ever made it to the last page of a book and wondered what you just read? It is no secret that my reading list is a mile long and therefore my reading time is precious to me. I am curious by nature and walk the nonfiction aisles of my library with a purpose. I have things that I want to know and my hope is the books that I choose will feed that curiosity. I make stacks and lists of topics and try to tackle them in a semi-organized fashion (let’s be honest though, the stacks and lists are so long I may never get to them all).

I decided to start on Egyptian history and found a short biography of Nefertiti. I own a copy of Michelle Moran’s Nefertiti but haven’t found the time to start it yet. It’s buried between A Guide to Serial Killers, a pictorial history of Hurricane Katrina and a biography of Andrew Jackson. (My reading knows few limits.) I thought the biography would be a great introduction but it was a major disappointment. Although the book is titled for the Queen, much of the time is spent reading about her husband. I should have thrown the red flag when I read the author’s note that the story would be told from Nefertiti’s point of view in current time. The short version:

Nefertiti came from a family who was close to the King and Queen, so she was destined to marry the prince. They marry at 15 and 16 and have children. The prince who is now King decides that there is only one god, the sun itself. He wants everyone to believe this and angers his people. Bad luck comes knocking and everyone dies.

Does that answer all your questions? Mine either. I know that I signed up for a short biography but I think there might be more to the story… How do you select your nonfiction titles? Do you read reviews prior to selecting? If you have any Egyptian books to recommend, please reach out so I can add them to my list!

Book Review Saturday: Cinders & Sapphires

“Looking up into the depth of the night and the countless stars, she felt somehow as if she were standing on the brink of a precipice, and that if she had the courage to step forward, she might find that she could fly.”

This book is definitely marketed for the Downton Abbey fan club that needs something to console them for their loss. I wanted so badly to love it, but the story line has been done before. These upstairs, downstairs books are supposed to leave us daydreaming of tea time and fighting for women’s independence. I just felt that I’d been there, done that.

Ada is expected to marry someone that will ensure her family’s fortune and keep her in luxury. She has other plans that include attending Oxford University and learning to support herself. On a return trip from India due to her father’s disgrace of his position (there is much talk and gossip as to what actually occurred), Ada meets Ravi and their kiss seems to open up a world of new possibilities for her. Act One occurs in Somerton where the family is returning home. Her father is quickly married to secure the estate from financial ruin. Ada longs to see Ravi and rejects a marriage proposal from an acceptable suitor because of her mixed emotions. Act Two moves us to London where Ada’s stepmother is determined to get invitations from all the right people to secure marriages for her own daughter and Ada. Ada convinces her father to allow her to attend a political dinner party by faking interest in Lord Fintan, who she shares many meaningful conversations with, to see Ravi again. This ends in an argument as Ravi believes her flirting to be true feelings. They part ways only to be brought back together as Ada returns to Somerset. Ravi is offered a position to act as a go between for the British and Indian Congress and although he wants to marry Ada he knows it isn’t the best path for her. Act Three shares yet another marriage proposal for Ada from Lord Fintan who will allow her to attend Oxford once they are engaged. There are several side stories caring on alongside Ada, my favorite being her ladies maid Rose. Rose was promoted from a downstairs maid to waiting on Ada. She is a wonderful piano player and writes her own music. Her story follows alongside with her struggle to want more and see her compositions on stage. She ties in the elements of the downstairs while assisting Ada with passing letters between her and Ravi.

The whole thing reads as more of a fairy tale than real life. First off, three marriage proposals just doesn’t read well to me. I know they help tie the story together but it felt like something else should be happening. It was expected and therefore disappointing as a reader. Second, I feel that the relationship between Sebastian and Oliver is forced. If you want to throw in a relationship between two men then it shouldn’t feel like the exact relationship in every other story line. Man loves man, man is blackmailed by man, and new man stands up against blackmailer. It has been done too many times. Lastly, there is SO much love in this story. Everyone is in love with someone. Can someone just be content with themselves? I needed a love break once it ended. I will say that I was intrigued with the insight into the British occupation of India. This has always been one of my favorite research topics and this element alone kept me reading. Overall it wasn’t a waste of time, but I don’t have a desire to continue the series. 

Who shares my love for Downton Abbey? Do you have any books that have helped fill the void? I’d love to hear from you!