Write About it Wednesday: Serial Killers, Henry Lee Lucas

“I was bitter at the world. I hated everything. There wasn’t nothin’ I liked. I was bitter as bitter could be.”

Disclaimer: Violent crime content.

It is no secret that I love crime. Crime novels, crime podcasts, past crimes and all the in between. I found a copy of Serial Killers by Joel Norris at my local book sale. One dollar to read about the nature, personal statements and unifying patters of a serial killer? Sold! I’m covering this book in small increments because it is loaded with information. Although some of it is outdated, it allows me the foundation for branching out on my own for further research. I had not heard of Henry Lee Lucas before this book. One completely creepy fact before I dive in: We share the same birthday. I didn’t even realize until I was reviewing the text again to write this review…but whoa. Isn’t it weird when you share the same birthday with someone or is it just me? It peaked my interest in his case even more.

Henry Lee Lucas was starved, beaten, forced to watch his mother have sex, even forced to wear girls’ clothing for his mother’s amusement. He watched his mother shoot one of her clients with a shotgun while blood splattered on him. His mother would kill or break anything he liked, just for the sake of taking his happiness away. Her abuse went so far as beating him over the head with a 2 x 4 piece of wood so hard that he laid in a semi-conscious state for over 3 days. The brain damage would later be linked to his lack of control over his violent behavior and ability to manage emotions. He finally killed her. He was sentenced to prison for the murder but was later released.

Lucas claims he committed his first murder, a 17-year-old female, when he was just 15 years old. He had sex with animals, sex with his half-brother and later married his 12-year-old cousin. Beth was originally raised as his “daughter” but the two claimed to be common law married up until her death by Lucas. In a heated argument about her desire to return home, he stabbed her in the chest and then cut her into pieces in Montague County, TX. Although he ended up confessing to 100s of murders along Interstate 35, his only other known kill was Granny Rich who was the only person close to him remaining. Many of his claims turned out to be false, but investigators had to rely on the information they had.

This book does an excellent job of listing out the many reasons behind his behavior. He was unable to cope with negative stimulus and was prone to blackouts. The propensity for violence was there at an early age, and given the constant abuse from his mother, only intensified. He noted that he only committed murder after drinking large amounts of alcohol. That mixed with his brain injuries led to little to no control over his emotions. He did not feel any remorse until he was acclimated to the prison system where his diet, routine and personality development could be nurtured.

How does this type of abuse go unnoticed? How do brain injuries go untreated or acknowledged? I found this case to be interesting for two reasons, a) the amount of research performed on his body, diet, etc. and how it related to his crimes and b) his outright confession to so many murders. We may never know how many he truly committed but that is only half of the story. 

What is everyone reading this month? Any spooky Halloween recommendations? I’d love to hear from you!

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2 thoughts on “Write About it Wednesday: Serial Killers, Henry Lee Lucas

  1. Had a neighbor that was part of the team of Texas Rangers that tracked him down and arrested him. Said he was one weird duck!! Think I’ll pass on this read. It would give me the creeps if not nightmares!!

    Liked by 1 person

    • I live in Texas so it was a little too close to home! That’s neat about your neighbor. I bet he has some interesting stories to tell! I love hearing from my law enforcement friends about their adventures.

      Like

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